San Diego Zoo visit

It has been many years since I last visited the  San Diego Zoo in Balboa Park.  This zoo of approximately 3,700 animals of roughly 650 species and subspecies is situated on 100 acres (40ha) and is one of the most well-regarded zoos in the USA. it was a product of the 1915 Panama-California Exposition using the wild animal enclosures that were abandoned when the exposition ended. Its permanent location was agreed upon in 1921 on land and with animals owned by the City of San Diego and managed by a conservatory. The zoo is a pioneer of cage-less exhibits that protect the animals and visitors by a moat system.

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A little day trip to Joshua Tree National Park

JT map

Park Map

At the end of May I decided to head out to Joshua Tree National Park to visit the Old Dale Mining District on BLM land that is located just outside the northeast portion of the park. Joshua Tree National Park is an environmental melting pot where 2 desert ecosystems meet, the Mojave Desert to the north and west and the Colorado Desert to the south and east. The Mojave Desert ecosystem consists of boulder stacks with pinyon pines, junipers and scrub oaks and the famous joshua tree. The Colorado Desert ecosystem in contrast consists of creosote, spidery ocotillo and jumping cholla cactus. Jumping cactus or teddy bear cactus got its name from the fact it tends to stick to anything within its range and is very painful to remove from the skin.

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I share this post as I feel 100% that this is why I travel

Written by Brian Callender | Photography by Julie Boyd Without question, we live in a pretty incredible time period in human history. Thanks to technological advances, the world is at its most interconnected, making travel accessible to the masses. Much like it has been since people first roamed this earth, the world can also be […]

via Why We Travel and Why You Should Too — Bound to Explore

SO WHAT IS STEAMPUNK?

In the last post my grandson and I visited The Orange Empire Railroad Museum (LINK) while a Steampunk special event was going on. It was wonderful seeing this sub-culture and experiencing the fun and positive attitude of all the people there.

So what is Steampunk? 1987 marked the first known use of the term “steampunk”.

Steampunk perhaps most recognizably features include futuristic inventions as people in the 19th century might have envisioned them. Its basis in reinterpreting the era’s perspective on fashion, culture, architectural style, and art.  Such technology may include fictional machines like those found in the works of H.G. Wells and Jules Verne, or of the modern authors Philip Pullman, Scott Westerfeld, Stephen Hunt, and China Miéville.  Steampunk can contain alternative-history-style presentations of such technology.

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Orange Empire Railraod Museum

A few weeks ago my grandson and I visited the Orange Empire Railway Museum (LINK) when the annual Steampunk fair was being held. This non-profit museum opened in 1956 to preserve Southern California’s railway history that dates from the 1870’s. With over 200 historic railway locomotives, passenger cars, freight cars, streetcars, interurban electric cars, buildings, and other artifacts from Los Angeles and the West, the 90-acre site in Perris, California is open to the public every day except Thanksgiving and Christmas (check site for current opening days, times and special events).

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Chesters Fort and Hadrian’s Wall

Chesters Fort Rendering from the south

After the morning wandering and exploring Beamish we drove approximately 30 miles to visit Chesters Fort (LINK) a part of Hadrian’s Wall (LINK). Driving along beautiful countryside we had to have the car disinfected for Foot and Mouth. Arriving at the fort we visited the museum to learn the history of the wall and fort, then walked through disinfecting mats for our short walk to the fort.

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